Shoreline Honors College students present their work at UW Research Symposium

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Nine Shoreline Honors students presented their work at the 21st Annual University of Washington Undergraduate Research Symposium at Mary Gates Hall on May 18, 2018.

While this is not the first year Shoreline has been represented at the prestigious event, this is the largest cohort of students that has presented at the symposium. Participation is application based and competitive.

Student presenters and their research topics included: 
Cheri Coleman: Joking Not Joking: How Late-Night Humor Impacts Politics
Decker Eveleth:
 Worse than Nothing: Strategic Ballistic Missile Defense and Great Power Deterrence
Taylor Jacobson: The Elephant in the Room: How Inadequate Care and Zoonotic Disease Undermine the Benefits of Owning Exotic Animals
Eli Lotz: Diversity of the Human Experience: A Multidisciplinary Review of the Literature on Emotional Concepts Across Cultures
Lori MacPherson: Positive or Negative? Understanding Ultrasound Experiences
Natasha Meyers: Something About Weinstein: Rape Culture in Hollywood
Rim Salomon: Attributes of Resilience: A Look at the Lives of Immigrants
Sara Shojai: Diversity: The Missing Component of Universal Design
Jillian Thompson: The Hand That Feeds: How Policies for Pain Perpetuate Opioid Abuse and a Non-pharmaceutical Solution

The Honors College currently has 14 research track students, of which 9 participated in the symposium. All 14 research students will be presenting their work on Shoreline’s campus on June 11 and 13 from 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. in PUB 9208. This event is open to all members of the campus as well as the larger Shoreline community.

Shoreline students joined more than 1,200 presenters from Washington and beyond in the day-long symposium at the UW, which aims to facilitate research experiences for undergraduates that motivate understanding of concepts through their application to real problems and helps students to develop a deeper understanding of more complex materials.

“What it really represents is an opportunity for Shoreline students to show themselves they can do the same level of outstanding work as their peers at University,” said Terry Taylor, a research track faculty member in the Honors College.

“For many students, the thought of presenting their work next to a UW student is intimidating–especially as the UW presenters are upper division (juniors and seniors), while our Shoreline students attend as sophomores,” Taylor continued. “But when they arrive at the event our students realize they are prepared, they know their topic front and back, and their work is as high-caliber as other participants’.”

Students echoed this sentiment. Presenter Cheri Coleman said, “When I first walked into the symposiums my heart started racing because the sheer amount of people and how loud it was. Once I received my easel assignment…I noticed everyone was equally as nervous. I also was able to see that there wasn’t much of a difference between the posters/preparedness of UW and Shoreline students.”

Presenter Eli Lotz said, “It was really cool to be able to see all of the other students at the symposium presenting an amazing array and diversity of research, and to be able to stand up next to them and present my own work after two quarters of working on my topic was extremely gratifying. It was…a really great opportunity to experience the research environment and engage with other like-minded students.”

“Having this large of a group present at this upper division research symposium is a great testimony to the quality of our students’ work in the Honors College at Shoreline,” said Taylor. “We’re very proud of all our students and their top-level output.”

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