World Affairs Council speaker series

Please tell your students about this great slate of events from the World Affairs Council, a partner of Shoreline’s Global Affairs Center.

International Conflict on a Cyber Battlefield
Dr. Adam Segal, director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Expert on security issues, technology development, and Chinese domestic and foreign policy.
June 1 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Stoel Rives LLP
Register here

The United States in the Asia Pacific
featuring Lt. General Lanza, commander Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and Dane Chamorro, Senior Managnig Director of Control Risks South-East Asia.
June 2 @ 6:00 PM – 7 :30 PM
K&L Gates LLP
Register here

The Director of National Intelligence on “Global Threats to U.S. National Security”
James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence. Appointed by President Obama in 2010 and serving as his principal intelligence adviser.
June 3 @ 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Perkins Coie LLP
Register here

The Iran Deal and U.S. Policy in the Middle East
Featuring Ambassador William Luers, director of The Iran Project, and Jessica Tuchman Mathews, fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
June 9 @ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Dorsey & Whitney LLP
Register here

Save the Date: 
Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins
June 16 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Registration coming soon

Follow the Money: The Financial Instruments of U.S. Foreign Security
Adam J. Szubin, Acting Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence
June 27 @ 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Perkins Coie LLP
Registration coming soon

Campus events for Thurs., April 14: Molly Magai Artist’s Reception, Great Discussions series, and more

Intramural Zumba, Athletics Room 3025
Thurs., April 14: 12:35-1:25 p.m.
Free to all Shoreline Community College students, faculty, and staff.

Artist’s Reception – Painting by Molly Magai, Admin (1000) bldg. gallery
Thurs., April 14: 4-6 p.m.
MOLLY MAGAI Poster-email[5]
Molly Magai makes paintings of landscapes dominated by cities, roads, industry, and the living things that inhabit them. These structures, created for human convenience, are very much in conflict with nature. They are also an awe-inspiring human accomplishment, the work of generations of builders and engineers. Most of us ignore these landscapes as we pass by them. Magai’s job as a genre painter is to make you see them, in their destructiveness and their beauty.

Magai make paintings based on snapshots she takes from a moving vehicle. Handicapped by the car’s speed, the camera creates inadvertent effects – unexpected colors, halos, and blurs. She is interested in the sensation of speed, and the way the image is filtered first through the camera, the painter, and the painting.

Intramural Personal Training, Athletics room 3007
Thurs., April 14: 6:05-6:50 p.m.

Free to all Shoreline Community College students, faculty, and staff.

Great Discussions Series: The Middle East, Room 1010(M)
Thurs., April 14: 6:30-8 p.m.
Part of the Great Discussions series. Part of an 8-part series, *registration is required. For more information go to the GAC website, or contact Larry Fuell (lfuell@shoreline.edu, 206-533-6750) or Elouiessa Muana (emuana2@shoreline.edu, 206-546-6996.

*Attending individual seminars is possible, if space available; contact Larry Fuell. $5 entrance fee collected at door.

Only a few spots left for Great Discussion series, starting April 7

great discussions
Spring 2016
Eight Thursday Evenings
April 7 – May 26
6:30-8 p.m.
Room 1010(M)

Enrollment is limited. Click Here to Register Now! 

What better way to (re)think about the world and America’s role than to share thoughts with friends and neighbors about some of the hottest foreign policy issues confronting the United States today.   This series, utilizing Foreign Policy Association materials, will meet each Thursday evening for eight weeks, starting April 7 through May 26.

Topics we will discuss include:

$35 to register for the series (8 meetings) Register here!

Students can receive credit for participating!! See below.

For more information go to the GAC website, or contact Larry Fuell (lfuell@shoreline.edu, 206-533-6750) or Elouiessa Muana (emuana2@shoreline.edu, 206-546-6996

*Attending individual seminars is possible, if space available; contact Larry Fuell. $5 entrance fee collected at door.

Issue brief summaries:
Middle East (April 7)
From a proxy war in Yemen to an ongoing civil war in Syria, a number of ongoing conflicts have shaken the traditional alliances in the Middle East to their core. As alliances between state and non-state actors in the region are constantly shifting, the U.S. has found itself between a rock and a hard place. In a series of conflicts that are far from being black-and-white, what can the U.S. do to secure its interests in the region without causing further damage and disruption?

The Rise of ISIS (April 14)
Born out of an umbrella organization of Al Qaeda in Iraq, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) burst onto the international stage after it seized Falluja in December 2013. Since then, the group has seized control of a number of critical strongholds in the country and declared itself a caliphate, known as the Islamic State. Still, the question remains: What is ISIS, and what danger does it pose to U.S. interests?

Climate change (April 21)** Note: this discussion will take place in 9208, starting at 7 p.m.
In the past few years, the American public has become more aware of the damage wrought by climate change. From droughts in the west to extreme weather in the east, a rapidly changing climate has already made its footprint in the United States. Now, it’s expected that the presidential election in 2016 will be one of the first ever to place an emphasis on these environmental changes. What can the next president do to stymie this environmental crisis? And is it too late for these efforts to be effective?

The Future of Kurdistan (April 28)
Kurdistan, a mountainous region made up of parts of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Armenia and Syria, is home to one of the largest ethnic groups in West Asia: the Kurds. Now, most in the West know them for their small, oil-rich autonomous region in northern Iraq called Iraqi Kurdistan — one of the U.S.’ closer allies in the Middle East and a bulwark against the expansion of the so-called Islamic State. What does the success of Iraqi Kurdistan mean for Kurds in the surrounding region?

Migration (May 5)
As a record number of migrants cross the Mediterranean Sea to find refuge in Europe, the continent is struggling to come up with an adequate response. Although Europe’s refugees are largely fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq and parts of Africa, their struggle is hardly unique. Today, with the number of displaced people is at an all-time high, a number of world powers find themselves facing a difficult question: How can they balance border security with humanitarian concerns? More importantly, what can they do to resolve these crises so as to limit the number of displaced persons?

The Koreas (May 12)
At the end of World War II, Korea was divided in two. The northern half of the Korean peninsula was occupied by the Soviet Union, the southern by the United States. Today, North and South Korea couldn’t be further apart. The North is underdeveloped, impoverished and ruled by a corrupt, authoritarian government, while the South advanced rapidly to become one of the most developed countries in the world. With such a wide gap, some are asking if unification is possible, even desirable, anymore?

The United Nations (May 19)
On the eve of the international organization’s 70th birthday, the United Nations stands at a crossroads. This year marks a halfway point in the organization’s global effort to eradicate poverty, hunger and discrimination, as well as ensure justice and dignity for all peoples. But as the UN’s 193 member states look back at the success of the millennium development goals, they also must assess their needs for its sustainable development goals — a new series of benchmarks, which are set to expire in 2030. With the appointment of the ninth secretary-general in the near future as well, the next U.S. president is bound to have quite a lot on his or her plate going into office.

Cuba and the U.S. (May 26)
The U.S. announced in December 2014 that, after decades of isolation, it has begun taking major steps to normalize relations with Cuba, its neighbor to the south. The announcement marks a dramatic shift away from a policy that has its roots in one of the darkest moments of the Cold War — the Cuban missile crisis. Although the U.S. trade embargo is unlikely to end any time soon, American and Cuban leaders today are trying to bring a relationship once defined by a crisis in the 1960s into the 21st century.

Think about it, talk about it: Great Discussions series starts April 7

great discussions
Spring 2016
Eight Thursday Evenings
April 7 – May 26
6:30-8 p.m.
Room 1010(M)

Enrollment is limited. Click Here to Register Now! 

What better way to (re)think about the world and America’s role than to share thoughts with friends and neighbors about some of the hottest foreign policy issues confronting the United States today.   This series, utilizing Foreign Policy Association materials, will meet each Thursday evening for eight weeks, starting April 7 through May 26.

Topics we will discuss include:

$35 to register for the series (8 meetings) Register here!

Students can receive credit for participating!! See below.

For more information go to the GAC website, or contact Larry Fuell (lfuell@shoreline.edu, 206-533-6750) or Elouiessa Muana (emuana2@shoreline.edu, 206-546-6996

*Attending individual seminars is possible, if space available; contact Larry Fuell. $5 entrance fee collected at door.

Issue brief summaries:

Middle East (April 7)
From a proxy war in Yemen to an ongoing civil war in Syria, a number of ongoing conflicts have shaken the traditional alliances in the Middle East to their core. As alliances between state and non-state actors in the region are constantly shifting, the U.S. has found itself between a rock and a hard place. In a series of conflicts that are far from being black-and-white, what can the U.S. do to secure its interests in the region without causing further damage and disruption?

The Rise of ISIS (April 14)
Born out of an umbrella organization of Al Qaeda in Iraq, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) burst onto the international stage after it seized Falluja in December 2013. Since then, the group has seized control of a number of critical strongholds in the country and declared itself a caliphate, known as the Islamic State. Still, the question remains: What is ISIS, and what danger does it pose to U.S. interests?

Climate change (April 21)** Note: this discussion will take place in 9208, starting at 7 p.m.
In the past few years, the American public has become more aware of the damage wrought by climate change. From droughts in the west to extreme weather in the east, a rapidly changing climate has already made its footprint in the United States. Now, it’s expected that the presidential election in 2016 will be one of the first ever to place an emphasis on these environmental changes. What can the next president do to stymie this environmental crisis? And is it too late for these efforts to be effective?

The Future of Kurdistan (April 28)
Kurdistan, a mountainous region made up of parts of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Armenia and Syria, is home to one of the largest ethnic groups in West Asia: the Kurds. Now, most in the West know them for their small, oil-rich autonomous region in northern Iraq called Iraqi Kurdistan — one of the U.S.’ closer allies in the Middle East and a bulwark against the expansion of the so-called Islamic State. What does the success of Iraqi Kurdistan mean for Kurds in the surrounding region?

Migration (May 5)
As a record number of migrants cross the Mediterranean Sea to find refuge in Europe, the continent is struggling to come up with an adequate response. Although Europe’s refugees are largely fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq and parts of Africa, their struggle is hardly unique. Today, with the number of displaced people is at an all-time high, a number of world powers find themselves facing a difficult question: How can they balance border security with humanitarian concerns? More importantly, what can they do to resolve these crises so as to limit the number of displaced persons?

The Koreas (May 12)
At the end of World War II, Korea was divided in two. The northern half of the Korean peninsula was occupied by the Soviet Union, the southern by the United States. Today, North and South Korea couldn’t be further apart. The North is underdeveloped, impoverished and ruled by a corrupt, authoritarian government, while the South advanced rapidly to become one of the most developed countries in the world. With such a wide gap, some are asking if unification is possible, even desirable, anymore?

The United Nations (May 19)
On the eve of the international organization’s 70th birthday, the United Nations stands at a crossroads. This year marks a halfway point in the organization’s global effort to eradicate poverty, hunger and discrimination, as well as ensure justice and dignity for all peoples. But as the UN’s 193 member states look back at the success of the millennium development goals, they also must assess their needs for its sustainable development goals — a new series of benchmarks, which are set to expire in 2030. With the appointment of the ninth secretary-general in the near future as well, the next U.S. president is bound to have quite a lot on his or her plate going into office.

Cuba and the U.S. (May 26)
The U.S. announced in December 2014 that, after decades of isolation, it has begun taking major steps to normalize relations with Cuba, its neighbor to the south. The announcement marks a dramatic shift away from a policy that has its roots in one of the darkest moments of the Cold War — the Cuban missile crisis. Although the U.S. trade embargo is unlikely to end any time soon, American and Cuban leaders today are trying to bring a relationship once defined by a crisis in the 1960s into the 21st century.

Campus events for Thurs., Feb. 11: Advising day, personal transformation, time management, and more!

Here are the events happening around campus for Thursday, Feb. 11.

Advising Day! Table in the Library, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
advising
Planning to graduate at the end of Winter quarter? Your application for graduation should be submitted by February 15. Still have questions? Come talk with an advisor in the library.

Personal Transformation and Travel to South Africa, PUB 9208, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
*A Sequel Report on the summer 2015 Study Abroad Experience
south africa 1
This past summer, a group of students, led by Professor Ernest Johnson, experienced a 4-week summer program in Cape Town where they examined the social and cultural history of South Africa, and explored current efforts to create a democratic, multicultural nation.

During this session, the students will report on what they felt and what they heard from the people they met. They participated in many social events and historical lectures, including school visits, lectures by community leaders, and home-stays inside “Black” townships and homelands.

Intramural Zumba, Athletics bldg., room 3025, 12:35-1:25 p.m.
Take time out from your busy day to dance your way fit. Free to students, faculty, and staff.

Planning for a Science Degree, Library Classroom 4214, 1-2:30 p.m.
Science faculty advisers will discuss requirements and course sequencing for the Associate in Science Degree Track 1 and 2. In addition, the advisers will help each student draft an individual educational (course) plan.

Managing and Prioritizing Your Time, PUB 9208, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
clocks
Part 1 of the Time Management Series:
Creating and establishing a study schedule and planning for your quarter are keys to supporting your success. Learning and practicing time management is an important part of your school and work life. Come explore your goals and priorities and learn how to create a plan for YOU and YOUR SUCCESS this quarter!

*This session will be recorded and posted online. To view go to our YouTube site.

Intramural Personal Training, Athletics bldg. Room 3007, 6-6:50 p.m.
Come get free, hands-on training to help you reach your fitness goals.